Dar es Salaam – Tanzania’s Megacity

It looks like around 4.8 mio people or 10% of Tanzania’s population are living in Dar es Salaam metropolitan area.  It is the economic and administrative hub of the country with a large harbor connecting to roads and rail leading out to the countryside. The airport connects to local and African destinations, plus to Amsterdam, Istanbul, Dubai and Abu Dhabi, some important international hubs. Dar has a problem with slums where many people live without running water or basic services. 70% of the city’s population is estimated to live in informal settlements, according to a World Bank estimate from 2002. Half of them live on less than $1 a day and are vulnerable to flooding and droughts. Dar is one of the world’s fastest growing cities, requiring circumspect city planning which is not happening fast enough.

How to shape the future

After promising progress in the last 15 years the world community wants to finish off what they started and tackle the next challenges: Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) or a post-2015 Development Strategy which still needs to be agreed and finalized in detail. The goals is to drive five big transformation shifts until 2030:

1. Leave No One Behind
After 2015 we should move from reducing to ending extreme poverty, in all its forms. We should ensure that no person – regardless of ethnicity, gender, geography, disability, race or other status – is denied basic economic opportunities and human rights.

2. Put Sustainable Development at the Core
We have to integrate the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability. We must act now to slow the alarming pace of climate change and environmental degradation, which pose unprecedented threats to humanity.

3. Transform Economies for Jobs and Inclusive Growth
A profound economic transformation can end extreme poverty and improve livelihoods, by harnessing innovation, technology, and the potential of business. More diversified economies, with equal opportunities for all, can drive social inclusion, especially for young people, and foster sustainable consumption and production patterns.

4. Build Peace and Effective, Open and Accountable Institutions for All
Freedom from conflict and violence is the most fundamental human entitlement, and the essential foundation for building peaceful and prosperous societies. At the same time, people the world over expect their governments to be honest, accountable, and responsive to their needs. We are calling for a fundamental shift – to recognize peace and good governance as a core element of well-being, not an optional extra.

5. Forge a New Global Partnership
A new spirit of solidarity, cooperation, and mutual accountability must underpin the post-2015 agenda. This new partnership should be based on a common understanding of our shared humanity, based on mutual respect and mutual benefit. It should be centered on people, including those affected by poverty and exclusion, women, youth, the aged, disabled persons, and indigenous peoples. It should include civil society organizations, multilateral institutions, local and national governments, the scientific and academic community, businesses, and private philanthropy.
(source: Wikipedia)

My thoughts: Quite a program, quite a show. Wondering why the genocide in Rwanda was allowed to happen and why Iraq was invaded. Both seemingly go against what humanity wants to achieve. Let’s find out what the world community of 193 countries will agree on in their September 2015 meeting. What are your opinions?

(photo by U.N. on flickr)

Saving the World – Millennium Style

I was wondering how the development industry wanted to make this world a better place in the year 2000. Here’s what the global community wanted to achieve between 2000 and 2015: Millennium Development Goals (MDG)

  1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and empower women
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases
  7. Ensure environmental sustainability
  8. Develop a global partnership for development

(source: Wikipedia)

Do you want to know how well the world has done in 14 years? Here is the latest 2014 chart showing some very real progress. Compare it to 2005 (below) to see how the number of the red cells has gone down. 2014: 6 elements in the red; 2005: 34 red cells. That’s a whopping 75% improvement!

Currently the strategy for the future is being discussed. Find out more in the next post.

MDG_2014_progress_chart
Status 2014
MDG_2005_progress_chart
Status 2005
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